Introducing Your Kids to Hurricane Emergency Preparedness

Hurricane season is here and it’s time to prepare the whole family.

Long before the winds pick up and the water starts to rise, start preparing for the storm that’s brewing. Keep kids in the loop by calmly and confidently explaining to them the different things you’re doing to manage the house and home. As you’re boarding up your windows, for example, have them help by managing the inventory. Explain to them the why behind the various ways you’re preparing the house and they’ll be more eager to be of assistance, not to mention they’ll grow into confident and capable hurricane preppers themselves!

You’ll likely want to rearrange the house and put low items up high. Make sure kids are aware that the reason you’re rearranging the house is to save household items in the event of flooding.

Hearing this might be slightly unnerving. But packing the emergency kit with the help of the kids, full of items like: food, water, clothes, medical supplies, pet supplies, tools, and chargers, may give them peace of mind knowing that the whole family is doing everything to stay safe. That also includes having a plan to ensure everyone knows where to go and what to do, and the emergency numbers to call in case the family becomes separated.

When the winds and rain finally do come through, keep everyone inside and together. Make sure the kids know why you’re staying away from windows and glass doors. And give them duties to be proud of! Put kids in charge of listening to the weather radio to see if emergency personnel recommend an evacuation.

After the storm passes and everything is calm, let the kids know there’s still reason to be extremely cautious outside. Standing water might look like a fun place to swim, but it’s rife with unsanitary conditions and dangerous objects, not to mention downed power lines.

A hurricane is nothing to mess with. Since we can track a hurricane far in advance, that means we have the opportunity to get prepared and keep the whole family safe during the storm. And when kids are involved, remember: communication and involvement is always better than erratic instructions and being shut out of operations.